Transformation Story: Adelaide (Monster High)

You know what’s less fun than customizing dolls?

School.

But regardless, I found some time to squeeze out another custom in between reading for classes, class, working, and sleeping. And Netflix (what?).

I used similar techniques for Rochelle as I did for my freshwater Lagoona a while back, so for more of a tutorial on how I repaint my Monster High dolls, check out THIS post.

Adelaide started as a Zombie Shake Rochelle Goyle, albeit a slightly unique one…

Before!

Most of the Zombie Shake Rochelles have even bangs, but the one I got had been rooted incorrectly, from what I can tell, and so her bangs slant down the side of her face. I kind of like the look – honestly didn’t even notice something was off until I saw another bunch of Zombie Shake Rochelle’s at Target.

Let’s get started…

Wiped, wrapped, and sealed.
Wiped, wrapped, and sealed. 
The first layer of color.
The first layer of color.

For this Rochelle, I decided on a more mature look than she wore with her factory paint. Her eyes are smaller and reshaped to allow for a heavy lid. Instead of painting on lipstick, I went for a slightly softer lip coloring.

The second layer of color.
The second layer of color.

I began defining her eyes and lips a bit more. I added the cateye lash to her upper lids, added her tear ducts, and intensified her eye shadow. Her lips were brushed with another layer of color, darkest in the center of her lower lip.

She was looking a bit pale, so she has blush now, too.

This was like...a week later...and probably two layers later.
This was like…a week later…and probably three layers later.

Rochelle was giving me a lot of trouble with my MSC for some reason. But it also could have been the weather. I had a hell of a time getting intense colors, so I had to use quite a few layers of sealant to build up the color.

This shot was taken a week after I started her (no dolls on weekdays since school started). I probably sprayed two or three layers in between the last photo and this one, mostly just so I could layer on color.

Oh look, she's done!
Oh look, she’s done!

All done! One thing I really like about the Zombie Shake Rochelle are the cracks on her arm (you can see those in the picture above) and on her leg (you can’t see those, but I’m sure you have an imagination). I would have liked to keep some of the cracks on her face, but it didn’t quite fit with the look I had in mind for this repaint. Next time.

My only Rochelle repaints, side-by-side.
My two Rochelle repaints, side-by-side. I’ve improved a bit in the last two years…

Here you can see my two Rochelle repaints side-by-side. These are the same face mold. I think it’s incredible how a custom faceup can make the same face molds look completely different! The Rochelle on the right is one of my first repaints, and was an experiment in using primarily acrylics (no watercolor pencils). I’m thinking I’m going to re-repaint her now that I’ve gotten just a bit better at all this!

Both of these girls are in my Etsy shop! If you like the Rochelle on the right the way she is in the photo, adopt her quick! She’ll likely be taken down and repainted in the next month.

Transformation Story: Devon; Part II (Bratzillaz)

Why work on my real job when I can just paint dolls instead?

That was rhetorical.

Here’s part two of Devon’s transformation, her repaint! If you missed part one and want some tips on fixing wobbly heads, removing ink stains, and taming hair, check it out HERE.

Here’s the ‘Before’:

If only 80s hairstyles were still in...
If only 80s hairstyles were still in…

She was a Hot Mess. She came with another Bratzillaz, Violet, who I repainted first. If you want more tips on painting Bratzillaz and on using PearlEx powder, you can check her Transformation Story out HERE.

This doll has been named Devon. She’s a teenage witch, and attends a school for witches and other creatures with magical powers. That’s how she met her best friend, Violet, who’s a flower faerie. 

And ^ that is what happens when I watch fantasy TV shows while repainting dolls.

I wanted Devon to have a lot of character. Her friend Violet came out very nice and innocent and flower-faerie-ish, and I thought it would be fun if Devon had a noticeably different personality. She’s the edgy one of the duo.

IMG_3061As I’ve mentioned in other tutorials, eyebrows are the main conveyor of personality, so I knew right away that Devon would have a raised eyebrow and a lot of sass. I also figured I’d put some darker makeup on her.

At this point I think I’ve actually lost her body, because her head has been impaled on a Bic pen for so long.

Her eye shadow is a mixture of browns, black, and a dark purple (all chalk pastels). She also got heavier eyeliner compared to Violet. Her lips will be a reddish pink.

I broke down and decided that because Violet got glitter (and I mean glitter EVERYWHERE) Devon could have glitter. Check out Violet’s transformation story for more on PearlEx glitter.

IMG_3066Instead of putting glitter all over Devon’s face, though, she just got a touch on her eyelids and a dusting over her cheeks.

Because she still looked too ‘normal’ at this point I put some tiny black stars around her eyes. Because that’s…witchy….kind of…

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Transformation Story: Devon; Part I (Bratzillaz)

For the rescuers out there: you know when you get a doll from Ebay or Craigslist or wherever, and when she comes in the mail and you look at her you can’t help but think “what the hell happened to you?!”

Meet Devon, the red-head on the left.

Read on for tips on taming doll hair, fixing doll heads, and removing ink stains from doll faces.

They look worse in real life. This photo doesn't do the tragedy justice.
They look worse in real life. This photo doesn’t do the tragedy justice.

Devon arrived a Hot Mess with a capital H (and M). I have honestly no idea how a child could take a doll and mess it up so much. Did it get run over with a car? Did you try to draw and quarter it? Did you think her face would look better with blue marker over all of it?

“Yes” to all of the above!

To categorize the damage:

  • Her hair was not in optimal condition. As in, it had been converted into a mass of frizz and then a frustrated mom, in an attempt to tame it, put the frizz into five braids that really didn’t help the situation much.
  • Her stomach joint (yes, stomach joint) was a little loose. Still haven’t figured out how to fix that without drawing and quartering her all over again.
  • Her head was so wobbly it was pretty much just not attached to the neck anymore.
  • Best yet, there was blue marker all over her face.

The hair.

If only 80s hairstyles were still in...
If only 80s hairstyles were still in…

Fixing the hair was a three-day process. Now, hair is normally something I spend about half an hour on per doll. That’s it. I have no patience for hair.

For Devon, though, I was willing to put in more time only because I love Bratzillaz. Unfortunately I didn’t get pictures of the process, but it went something like this: brush brush brush brush boil boil brush boil brush pour pour brush brush scream in frustration boil brush. Brush.

For an in-depth tutorial on fixing, smoothing, and straightening doll hair, see my post here.

And after all that, here she is:

Look at the waves!
Look at the waves!

The head.

I followed the method explained in a video here by Novastar Dolls. Bratz and Bratzillaz are both made by the same company, as are Moxies, so their neck joints are all built the same way, and can thus be fixed the same way.

The only change I made to the steps in the video was to heat up the head by immersing it in hot water before I popped it off and on. The heat makes the vinyl more flexible, which makes it easier to remove the head. Heated vinyl is less likely to tear or crack, as well.

The face.

The stains are on her nose, cheeks, and chin.
The stains are on her nose, cheeks, and chin. They’re a little difficult to see from a computer screen.

Before I could repaint Devon, I had to get the stains out of her face.

If you have  a doll with ink stains or marker stains on her face, you know that acetone won’t get them out. You have to bleach the stains out, but regular bleach doesn’t work.

I used:

  1. Acne spot treatment with 10% benzoyl peroxide.
  2. UV rays (sun)

IMG_2829I bought a cheap acne treatment from Walgreens (it was about $5.50), and then removed Devon’s factory paint with acetone, being very very careful not to get acetone on her acrylic eyes (it will melt them). Then I used a Q-Tip to liberally apply the cream to the marker stains on her face.

IMG_2830It looks like shaving cream.

Then I put her out on the porch, hoping that the sun would do it’s work and I could get to work on the faceup in the evening.

Of course, that didn’t work out, because I live in Colorado, USA, where the weather is notorious for NEVER DOING NORMAL, PREDICTABLE THINGS. The sun immediately disappeared and it started thunderstorming out of the blue, so I gave up hope and decided to start a custom project for a customer.

Five days later….So the sun came back. Finally.

Technically, the sun came back two days later, but I have some carpenters re-building my deck and I figured I’d spare them the trauma of building around a body-less doll with white cream all over her face. See, that was nice and considerate of me.

After a day in the sun, all the stains were gone!

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Part II of Devon’s Transformation Story: the repaint!

Click HERE for more Transformation Stories!

Transformation Story: Violet (Bratzillaz)

I found a decent deal for two Bratzillaz on Ebay a couple weeks ago.

When they arrived, they were in horrible condition. Go figure.

They look worse in real life. This photo doesn't do the tragedy justice.
They look worse in real life. This photo doesn’t do the tragedy justice.

Yasmina (renamed Violet), the one with purple hair, has very frizzy hair, and a loose mid-section. These dolls have a weird stomach joint thing that I couldn’t figure out how to fix without major surgery. Her hands were also not doing so well (I performed surgery with a razor and cut off some extra plastic that was starting to split).

Meygana (renamed Devon) is my favorite doll of all the dolls ever (love her red-red hair and side-glancing eyes), but this Meygana is kind of a wreck. Her head is very wobbly, there are marker stains on her face, and her hair was a disaster of rather epic proportions. She deserves her own transformation story.

Back to Violet.

The 'before.' I honestly like this look a lot. Felt a little bad taking her paint off.
The ‘before.’ I honestly like this look a lot. Felt a little bad taking her paint off.

I first attempted to tame her hair a bit. It didn’t work all that well because a lot of her hair is just frizzies that no amount of boiling would fix. So I just threw it into pigtails and called it good. There are plans to curl the pigtails in the future.

The WIP.
The WIP.

After attempting to fix her hair I removed the paint, wrapped her up, and started repainting. I was going for a fairy.

The WIP below shows scotch tape over her eyes, which prevents Mr. Super Clear from dulling the glossy plastic. Unfortunately, I managed to get some acetone on her eyes while taking the paint off, which made a big streak of melted plastic over her pupil. I fixed it with a coat of varnish at the end.

WHY IS SHE GLITTERY?! Such an important question. Whenever there is glitter involved, ask questions.

PearlEx powder was made by the craft gods for those who love making everything sparkle.
PearlEx powder was made by the craft gods for those who love making everything sparkle.

PearlEx powder, or any similar product, is basically sparkle dust that can be applied dry to dolls’ faces or mixed with acrylic paint to make the paint metallic. I took a brush and applied dry dust to Violet’s eyelids, and then to her whole face. Because why not? She’s a baller fairy.

Clawdeen's lips were glossed with varnish that had been mixed with PearlEx powder.
Clawdeen’s lips were glossed with varnish that had been mixed with PearlEx powder.

A little note on applying PearlEx power dry: don’t forget to seal it! Also, sealing it will make the sparkles less noticeable, so I apply more sparkles than I think I need to, and sometimes I do two layers of glitter.

I finished Violet’s repaint with a flower design on her face. She is now adorned with an orange and purple pansy (my yellow watercolor pencil is MIA) and a dozen or so tiny lilacs.

She also got a coat of gloss on her lips and eyes.

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